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For the third time in the past two and a half years, the federal Department of Finance has moved to tighten the rules which apply to mortgages backed by the Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC).

It's that time of year again, when advertisements about the wisdom of contributing to your RRSP (and usually about the benefits of borrowing to do so) fills the airwaves and Web sites. And, since the introduction of tax-free savings accounts in 2009, February is now also the month in which Canadians wrestle with the question of whether to put any available funds into an RRSP before the contribution deadline of March 1, 2011, or whether to deposit those funds instead into a TFSA.

At this time of year, most taxpayers are focused on their tax obligations for the taxation year just ended on December 31, 2010—on the need to file a return for that year, on whether they will be able to come up with an RRSP contribution by March 1, the possibility that there will be taxes owed on filing (or perhaps a refund!), and if there are taxes owing, how to come up with the funds needed to pay that tax bill.

February is the month in which millions of Canadian taxpayers receive an Instalment Reminder from the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA). For many of the taxpayers who have received such notices in the past, the reminder and the tax instalment process are familiar, although not necessarily welcome. For those who are receiving one for the first time, however, both the reminder itself and figuring out how to deal with it can be baffling.

Two quarterly newsletters have been added, one about individual issues and one about corporate issues.

 
Newsletters

 



For the third time in the past two and a half years, the federal Department of Finance has moved to tighten the rules which apply to mortgages backed by the Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC).

It's that time of year again, when advertisements about the wisdom of contributing to your RRSP (and usually about the benefits of borrowing to do so) fills the airwaves and Web sites. And, since the introduction of tax-free savings accounts in 2009, February is now also the month in which Canadians wrestle with the question of whether to put any available funds into an RRSP before the contribution deadline of March 1, 2011, or whether to deposit those funds instead into a TFSA.

At this time of year, most taxpayers are focused on their tax obligations for the taxation year just ended on December 31, 2010—on the need to file a return for that year, on whether they will be able to come up with an RRSP contribution by March 1, the possibility that there will be taxes owed on filing (or perhaps a refund!), and if there are taxes owing, how to come up with the funds needed to pay that tax bill.

February is the month in which millions of Canadian taxpayers receive an Instalment Reminder from the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA). For many of the taxpayers who have received such notices in the past, the reminder and the tax instalment process are familiar, although not necessarily welcome. For those who are receiving one for the first time, however, both the reminder itself and figuring out how to deal with it can be baffling.

Two quarterly newsletters have been added, one about individual issues and one about corporate issues.

 
Newsletters

 



For the third time in the past two and a half years, the federal Department of Finance has moved to tighten the rules which apply to mortgages backed by the Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC).

It's that time of year again, when advertisements about the wisdom of contributing to your RRSP (and usually about the benefits of borrowing to do so) fills the airwaves and Web sites. And, since the introduction of tax-free savings accounts in 2009, February is now also the month in which Canadians wrestle with the question of whether to put any available funds into an RRSP before the contribution deadline of March 1, 2011, or whether to deposit those funds instead into a TFSA.

At this time of year, most taxpayers are focused on their tax obligations for the taxation year just ended on December 31, 2010—on the need to file a return for that year, on whether they will be able to come up with an RRSP contribution by March 1, the possibility that there will be taxes owed on filing (or perhaps a refund!), and if there are taxes owing, how to come up with the funds needed to pay that tax bill.

February is the month in which millions of Canadian taxpayers receive an Instalment Reminder from the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA). For many of the taxpayers who have received such notices in the past, the reminder and the tax instalment process are familiar, although not necessarily welcome. For those who are receiving one for the first time, however, both the reminder itself and figuring out how to deal with it can be baffling.

Two quarterly newsletters have been added, one about individual issues and one about corporate issues.

 
Home Firm Profile Client Services Info Center Newsletters Financial Tools Links Contact Us
 
Newsletters

 



For the third time in the past two and a half years, the federal Department of Finance has moved to tighten the rules which apply to mortgages backed by the Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC).

It's that time of year again, when advertisements about the wisdom of contributing to your RRSP (and usually about the benefits of borrowing to do so) fills the airwaves and Web sites. And, since the introduction of tax-free savings accounts in 2009, February is now also the month in which Canadians wrestle with the question of whether to put any available funds into an RRSP before the contribution deadline of March 1, 2011, or whether to deposit those funds instead into a TFSA.

At this time of year, most taxpayers are focused on their tax obligations for the taxation year just ended on December 31, 2010—on the need to file a return for that year, on whether they will be able to come up with an RRSP contribution by March 1, the possibility that there will be taxes owed on filing (or perhaps a refund!), and if there are taxes owing, how to come up with the funds needed to pay that tax bill.

February is the month in which millions of Canadian taxpayers receive an Instalment Reminder from the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA). For many of the taxpayers who have received such notices in the past, the reminder and the tax instalment process are familiar, although not necessarily welcome. For those who are receiving one for the first time, however, both the reminder itself and figuring out how to deal with it can be baffling.

Two quarterly newsletters have been added, one about individual issues and one about corporate issues.

 
Newsletters

 



For the third time in the past two and a half years, the federal Department of Finance has moved to tighten the rules which apply to mortgages backed by the Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC).

It's that time of year again, when advertisements about the wisdom of contributing to your RRSP (and usually about the benefits of borrowing to do so) fills the airwaves and Web sites. And, since the introduction of tax-free savings accounts in 2009, February is now also the month in which Canadians wrestle with the question of whether to put any available funds into an RRSP before the contribution deadline of March 1, 2011, or whether to deposit those funds instead into a TFSA.

At this time of year, most taxpayers are focused on their tax obligations for the taxation year just ended on December 31, 2010—on the need to file a return for that year, on whether they will be able to come up with an RRSP contribution by March 1, the possibility that there will be taxes owed on filing (or perhaps a refund!), and if there are taxes owing, how to come up with the funds needed to pay that tax bill.

February is the month in which millions of Canadian taxpayers receive an Instalment Reminder from the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA). For many of the taxpayers who have received such notices in the past, the reminder and the tax instalment process are familiar, although not necessarily welcome. For those who are receiving one for the first time, however, both the reminder itself and figuring out how to deal with it can be baffling.

Two quarterly newsletters have been added, one about individual issues and one about corporate issues.

 
Newsletters

 



For the third time in the past two and a half years, the federal Department of Finance has moved to tighten the rules which apply to mortgages backed by the Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC).

It's that time of year again, when advertisements about the wisdom of contributing to your RRSP (and usually about the benefits of borrowing to do so) fills the airwaves and Web sites. And, since the introduction of tax-free savings accounts in 2009, February is now also the month in which Canadians wrestle with the question of whether to put any available funds into an RRSP before the contribution deadline of March 1, 2011, or whether to deposit those funds instead into a TFSA.

At this time of year, most taxpayers are focused on their tax obligations for the taxation year just ended on December 31, 2010—on the need to file a return for that year, on whether they will be able to come up with an RRSP contribution by March 1, the possibility that there will be taxes owed on filing (or perhaps a refund!), and if there are taxes owing, how to come up with the funds needed to pay that tax bill.

February is the month in which millions of Canadian taxpayers receive an Instalment Reminder from the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA). For many of the taxpayers who have received such notices in the past, the reminder and the tax instalment process are familiar, although not necessarily welcome. For those who are receiving one for the first time, however, both the reminder itself and figuring out how to deal with it can be baffling.

Two quarterly newsletters have been added, one about individual issues and one about corporate issues.

 
Home Firm Profile Client Services Info Center Newsletters Financial Tools Links Contact Us
 
Newsletters

 



For the third time in the past two and a half years, the federal Department of Finance has moved to tighten the rules which apply to mortgages backed by the Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC).

It's that time of year again, when advertisements about the wisdom of contributing to your RRSP (and usually about the benefits of borrowing to do so) fills the airwaves and Web sites. And, since the introduction of tax-free savings accounts in 2009, February is now also the month in which Canadians wrestle with the question of whether to put any available funds into an RRSP before the contribution deadline of March 1, 2011, or whether to deposit those funds instead into a TFSA.

At this time of year, most taxpayers are focused on their tax obligations for the taxation year just ended on December 31, 2010—on the need to file a return for that year, on whether they will be able to come up with an RRSP contribution by March 1, the possibility that there will be taxes owed on filing (or perhaps a refund!), and if there are taxes owing, how to come up with the funds needed to pay that tax bill.

February is the month in which millions of Canadian taxpayers receive an Instalment Reminder from the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA). For many of the taxpayers who have received such notices in the past, the reminder and the tax instalment process are familiar, although not necessarily welcome. For those who are receiving one for the first time, however, both the reminder itself and figuring out how to deal with it can be baffling.

Two quarterly newsletters have been added, one about individual issues and one about corporate issues.

 
Newsletters

 



For the third time in the past two and a half years, the federal Department of Finance has moved to tighten the rules which apply to mortgages backed by the Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC).

It's that time of year again, when advertisements about the wisdom of contributing to your RRSP (and usually about the benefits of borrowing to do so) fills the airwaves and Web sites. And, since the introduction of tax-free savings accounts in 2009, February is now also the month in which Canadians wrestle with the question of whether to put any available funds into an RRSP before the contribution deadline of March 1, 2011, or whether to deposit those funds instead into a TFSA.

At this time of year, most taxpayers are focused on their tax obligations for the taxation year just ended on December 31, 2010—on the need to file a return for that year, on whether they will be able to come up with an RRSP contribution by March 1, the possibility that there will be taxes owed on filing (or perhaps a refund!), and if there are taxes owing, how to come up with the funds needed to pay that tax bill.

February is the month in which millions of Canadian taxpayers receive an Instalment Reminder from the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA). For many of the taxpayers who have received such notices in the past, the reminder and the tax instalment process are familiar, although not necessarily welcome. For those who are receiving one for the first time, however, both the reminder itself and figuring out how to deal with it can be baffling.

Two quarterly newsletters have been added, one about individual issues and one about corporate issues.

 
Newsletters

 



For the third time in the past two and a half years, the federal Department of Finance has moved to tighten the rules which apply to mortgages backed by the Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC).

It's that time of year again, when advertisements about the wisdom of contributing to your RRSP (and usually about the benefits of borrowing to do so) fills the airwaves and Web sites. And, since the introduction of tax-free savings accounts in 2009, February is now also the month in which Canadians wrestle with the question of whether to put any available funds into an RRSP before the contribution deadline of March 1, 2011, or whether to deposit those funds instead into a TFSA.

At this time of year, most taxpayers are focused on their tax obligations for the taxation year just ended on December 31, 2010—on the need to file a return for that year, on whether they will be able to come up with an RRSP contribution by March 1, the possibility that there will be taxes owed on filing (or perhaps a refund!), and if there are taxes owing, how to come up with the funds needed to pay that tax bill.

February is the month in which millions of Canadian taxpayers receive an Instalment Reminder from the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA). For many of the taxpayers who have received such notices in the past, the reminder and the tax instalment process are familiar, although not necessarily welcome. For those who are receiving one for the first time, however, both the reminder itself and figuring out how to deal with it can be baffling.

Two quarterly newsletters have been added, one about individual issues and one about corporate issues.

 
NSHARMACGA - Newsletters
Home Firm Profile Client Services Info Center Newsletters Financial Tools Links Contact Us
 
Newsletters

 



For the third time in the past two and a half years, the federal Department of Finance has moved to tighten the rules which apply to mortgages backed by the Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC).

It's that time of year again, when advertisements about the wisdom of contributing to your RRSP (and usually about the benefits of borrowing to do so) fills the airwaves and Web sites. And, since the introduction of tax-free savings accounts in 2009, February is now also the month in which Canadians wrestle with the question of whether to put any available funds into an RRSP before the contribution deadline of March 1, 2011, or whether to deposit those funds instead into a TFSA.

At this time of year, most taxpayers are focused on their tax obligations for the taxation year just ended on December 31, 2010—on the need to file a return for that year, on whether they will be able to come up with an RRSP contribution by March 1, the possibility that there will be taxes owed on filing (or perhaps a refund!), and if there are taxes owing, how to come up with the funds needed to pay that tax bill.

February is the month in which millions of Canadian taxpayers receive an Instalment Reminder from the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA). For many of the taxpayers who have received such notices in the past, the reminder and the tax instalment process are familiar, although not necessarily welcome. For those who are receiving one for the first time, however, both the reminder itself and figuring out how to deal with it can be baffling.

Two quarterly newsletters have been added, one about individual issues and one about corporate issues.

 
Newsletters